This Week’s Reads (March 17, 2017)

A few engrossing things unrelated to politics this week.

‘London Bridge is down’: the secret plan for the days after the Queen’s death – The Guardian
A long and interesting read about the arrangements for the eventual death of Queen Elizabeth II in an era of British decline.

The Invention of ‘Heterosexuality’ – BBC
An interesting discussion of the construction of heterosexuality as a “normal”.

The Young Pope
A TV diversion! We finished The Young Pope this week. I picked up about halfway through the show, mostly as background noise while knitting, but found myself engrossed. After reading The Onion’s recaps, I want to go back and rewatch for all of the details I missed (and that whole business with the kangaroo).

Sarah & Duck
Another TV diversion, this one for littles and their parents. Sarah and her duck friend, Duck, have gentle and imaginative adventures, like setting up a shallot circus, or visiting a hotel for ducks. It’s hard to say who in our household is most excited to watch more.

This Week’s Reads (March 10, 2017)

When Your Greatest Romance is a Friendship – NYTimes
Cheating a bit with this one as it really should’ve been included in last week’s round-up. A touching, beautiful story of friendship which, like its flashier cousin, love, can be wildly chemical and, like love, can happen in an instant.

How to Undermine Trump – Jacobin Magazine
While the entire (brief) article is worth reading, I found the concluding paragraph particularly powerful as I continue to mull over this week’s Day Without Women:
[T]he nation’s cultural gestalt has shifted over the past century such that people identify more as consumers than as producers, more by what they own and buy than by what they do and make. This is unfortunate, because workers’ power is greater at the point of production than almost anywhere else. That power can and should be used to take on Trump’s agenda.

“The Best Revenge is Your Paper: Notes on Women’s Work – Los Angeles Review of Books
If you’re at all interested in emotional labor, gendered expectations and values around work, or the patriarchy, get thee to this article RIGHT NOW.

What Do We Do With the Clothing of Grief – Racked
This was devastating: We hold pain in our bodies and then cover those bodies with clothes, and in some strange osmosis the pain is drawn into the fabric and woven together with scent, time, and loss.

Republicans are now paying the price for a years-long campaign of Obamacare lies – Vox
Everything about repeal/replace hurts my head. The most recent version hurts my heart. This article does a great job of breaking down the statements, policies, and intentions behind the Republican attacks on the Affordable Care Act, detailing how they’ve essentially painted themselves into a corner by making promises that can’t be fulfilled if they adhere to their party’s values. It’s all maddening and impossible.

You May Want to Marry My Husband – NYTimes
If you haven’t already read this love letter from a dying author about her remarkable husband, you probably should get your box of tissues ready.

This Week’s Reads (March 3, 2017)

This Mom Got Real About The Struggles Of Modern Motherhood – Refinery29
I read this on a morning when we were up at 5:07am with a massive diaper leak that required 6am laundry, which required planting the toddler in front of Lost and Found for ten minutes so that I could also clean up the kitchen enough to make desperately needed coffee as soon as it was reasonable to run the coffee grinder. I hate, hate, hate planting him in front of the TV, even highly vetted super sweet content, because I have this expectation that I should be able to manage him and all of the other balls that are up in the air. This article was a gentle reminder that it isn’t actually necessary to do all of those things simultaneously all the time – but sometimes it IS necessary, and ten minutes of TV isn’t the end of the world it means that IN ten minutes, I’m able to be more sane and present with my child.

#68 Vampire Rules – Reply All
Reply All is a podcast about the internet, and things related to the internet, and things only tangentially related to the internet. I started listening a couple of weeks ago and am currently working my way backward through the archive. This episode had me laughing on my commute, and then laughing at previous laughs, and then laughing some more. In it, the hosts try to figure out the backstory behind a creepy photo discovered on Tinder, which leads to a conversation about what’s acceptable in other people’s spaces, which leads to yes/yes/no, a feature in which the hosts challenge each others’ understanding of internet culture.

If you want to dip your toe into this podcast, may I also recommend #79 Boy in the Photo, which features the most amazing trolling that isn’t even remotely hateful, unlike most of the other trolling these days.

“We cannot find the bill”: inside the frantic hunt for the GOP Obamacare replacement – Vox
In case you needed another reminder that the leadership of our country is 100% cuckoo bananas.

This Week’s Reads (February 24, 2017)

How Doctors Take Women’s Pain Less Seriously – The Atlantic
This is horrible and accurate. While you’re feeling angry at the medical establishment, may I suggest also listening to this three part series on Bad Medicine from Freakonomics Radio? The second episode is particularly relevant, as it discusses the role of women in drug and device trials.

The Sanders/Cruz Debate was the Best Political TV in Ages – Current Affairs
I wish I’d seen this debate, and wish that THE debates were structured more along these lines, requiring candidates to dive deep into issues that matter and allowing voters to get a better sense of the true qualifications of the people in whose hands we’re investing tremendous power.

Reflecting on One Very, Very Strange Year at Uber – Susan J. Fowler
As if you needed another reason to dump Uber, Fowler, a former engineer, goes into great detail about a corporate culture that facilitates and enables sexual harassment by looking the other way if the harasser is a rising corporate star and punishing the victim if she stands in the way of the company’s (or the harasser’s) advancement.

This Week’s Reads (February 10, 2017)

A Reporter Explains What Out-Of-Towners Keep Getting Wrong About Chicago Violence – Chicagoist
This felt accurate and true, even in a week when the threat of violence felt very close to home for us.

What Happened to the Great Urban Design Projects? – NYTimes
This was clickbait for me as it relates to urban infrastructure – however, I enjoyed the discussion of the Golden Gate Bridge and of the Atlanta BeltLine, the subject of a book I picked up at Midwinter a few weeks ago.

Super-Ambitious Lake Shore Drive Proposal Would Add Park, Straighten Road – Chicagoist
Speaking of urban design/renewal projects, I’m super excited about the possible changes to Lakeshore Drive and the lakefront, even though they’re a few years off.

Is Obama’s official White House photographer trolling Donald Trump? – The Guardian
I love this.

This Week’s Reads (1/27/2017)

I don’t have a lot of extra cycles this week. I was in Atlanta last weekend at a conference doing conference things (meetings! attending presentations! carrying too much stuff around!), sharing meals and drinks with friends and colleagues that I don’t see often enough, and participating in the Atlanta March for Social Justice and Women (more on that later). Reentry after these whirlwind trips is always hard, but it’s been particularly overwhelming this week, when several work projects have come together at the same time while (it feels like) our country has imploded around us. I’ve alternated between trying to read all the news and make all the phone calls – and feeling so exhausted and demoralized by any one piece of news that I just want to put my head in the sand and tune out for the next four years. But I can’t do that.

I spent Tuesday morning teleworking from our car dealership – just routine service stuff – and the sign on the TV made me feel a little more sane, as did some of the below links. Right now it’s really hard to know how to direct our energy, where we can do the most good, or what news we should trust. It seems like the best thing we can do is keep leaning on each other as we find our way through.

Don’t shame the first steps of a resistance – SocialistWorker.org
Oh boy, did I need to read this. I’ve already talked about feeling shame about not doing enough before the election. This has been compounded by shaming in various online spaces from more active or established activists.We can and should all do better. Every event, movement, organization, and individual can be more inclusive. “But endless social media critiques with no commitment to diving into that struggle for the kind of movement we want is not a serious approach.”

After Women’s March, Longtime Chicago Activists Answer ‘What Next?’ – Chicagoist
Reflections and ideas for action from Chicago-area activists

How To Mobilize Your Election Fear & Anger Into Action In Chicago – Chicagoist
This is from November, but it’s worth a reread for Chicago-area folks. Lots of links to organizations that can use your help.

Ways To Take Effective Action Following The Magnificent Women’s March – Gothamist
Specific action items for leveraging the nascent movement embodied in the Women’s March

Trump’s executive order on Obamacare, explained by two health policy experts – Vox
This gives me at least a little hope that the repeal of the ACA, if it happens, won’t be as catastrophic as feared. (It will still be bad.)

Chicago To Trump: Go F*ck Yourself
“Chicago isn’t perfect. We have a dickhead for mayor, horribly crooked cops, an insane murder rate, and over 100 years of institutionalized racism that is literally embedded in the city’s infrastructure, but threatening the city with armed soldiers is a historically bad idea. Just the fact that a city built by immigrants and full of refugees, transplants, hipsters, and olds could unite to tell the highest elected official in the country to take a flying fuck at a rolling doughnut is proof that something good is happening.”

This Week’s Reads (1/6/2017)

In the Dark – APM
I binge-listened to the entire first season of this podcast over the last week. If you like Serial or Criminal or investigative journalism about true crime and police incompetence, this show is for you – though I might recommend NOT listening with good headphones when you’re the only one awake in your quiet apartment and you have your back to the door OR while running by yourself in a wooded area – which is to say that I managed to creep myself out pretty effectively.

‘James Bond of Philanthropy’ Gives Away the Last of His Fortune – New York Times
This is wonderful.

Why Medium Failed to Disrupt the Media – BloombergView
I was skeptical when I read a few months ago that Medium was supposed to be the future of publishing. Turns out that my skepticism was justified.

The Sex Talk I Plan to Give My Kids – Refinery29
The resources linked from this post are excellent.